Monday, November 23, 2020

Installation Views: Casey Roberts, Lingerer, November 6th-28th, 2020

INSTALLATION VIEWS
CASEY ROBERTS
LINGERER
NOVEMBER 6TH - 28TH

We are disappointed to announce that in-person viewings of Casey Roberts' show are being cut short due to Covid restrictions, but we hope you enjoy these installation views of his solo exhibition which continues until November 28th. As of Monday November 23rd our gallery with be closed for visits, however, we are still available by email and phone, and our artists' portfolios are up-to-date on our website. We will be offering pick-up at the gallery and local delivery.  If you would like to request more information or photos, we would be happy to help. 
















Wednesday, November 4, 2020

Casey Roberts: Lingerer, November 6th - 28th, 2020

CASEY ROBERTS
LINGERER
NOVEMBER 6TH - 28TH


We are pleased to present Lingerer, Casey Roberts's fourth solo exhibition with Dianna Witte Gallery. 

Casey Roberts's paintings are dark, yet humorous, animals play a leading role, and the work blends together to form a narrative. There's a moral of the story, one that hints at humans' relationship with nature with a knowing wink. In this way, the work is synonymous with a fairytale.

Owls, rabbits, the rare white buffalo, and whales are stand-ins for humans in Roberts's paintings; the tension and collaboration between man and nature is a repeated trope throughout Roberts's career--a trope that is mirrored in the photochemical process that is used to procure the paintings. The elaborate process, known as the cyanotype, depends on sunlight's reaction (nature) with chemicals, such as baking soda, peroxide, and bleach, (man) to create vibrant shades of cyan blue.

Casey's way of creating a painting is precarious: the process is akin to printmaking, using chemicals and light opposed to carving. The paintings are built up of layers; Roberts stencils off portions and exposes the paper to light, repeating this process until the painting is complete. He often finishes the paintings with elements of watercolour or collage, and leaves evidence of the process--an integral part of the work--with the holes used to pin the paper to the wall framing the exterior. A wrong move late in the process renders the work void and Roberts is forced to start over. The high stakes of the creative process imbue the paintings with a tension that is opposite to the balanced calm of the composition, creating work ripe with complexity.

In Roberts's drawings there are elements of abstraction and self-referential nods scattered throughout the realism. Patterns are found on tabletops, trees, and vases, resulting in unexpected texture and humour. Turn off the lights and the moon floating over the owl glows in the dark. The care and detail Roberts places in his fantastical tableaus seem to have no bounds, allowing the viewer to fall inside and live in his unique world.

Roberts received his degree from the Herron School of Art and Design in Indianapolis, IN. In September of 2019 he exhibited a solo show at the Richard E. Peeler Art Center at Depauw University. He has work in numerous collections, including the Indiana State Museum, the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, the US Department of State, Eli Lilly, Indiana University and more. Roberts lives and works in Indianapolis, IN. 











Tuesday, October 27, 2020

DWG @ Art Toronto 2020



DIANNA WITTE GALLERY
@ ART TORONTO
OCTOBER 28TH - NOVEMBER 8TH

We invite you to join us for our 11th year participating in Art Toronto. We will be extending our gallery hours during the fair so you have more opportunities to visit us. This year, the fair will be held on a virtual platform with artworks available for viewing in the gallery. We will be featuring recent works by:
Casey Roberts 
Corri-Lynn Tetz 
Douglas Walker 
Fiona Freemark 
Jeremy Miranda 
Leah Rainey &
Ric Santon.


EXTENDED GALLERY HOURS
October 28th - November 8th
Wednesday - Sunday, 12-6PM

EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW
Email info@diannawitte.com to request a sneak peek of new works available at DWG for Art Toronto 2020.

NATIONAL GALLERY HOP
Saturday November 7th, 12-6PM

CORRI-LYNN TETZ
CLOSING RECEPTION
OCTOBER 31ST AT 2, 3 & 4PM

*RSVP REQUIRED BELOW - DETAILS MAY CHANGE DUE TO COVID RESTRICTIONS*

Join us for the closing reception of Corri-Lynn Tetz' solo exhibition, Soft Touch. Corri-Lynn first exhibited with us in Summer Forecast, a group show curated by Tatum Dooley in 2019. We are thrilled to be featuring Tetz again with her first solo show at Dianna Witte Gallery. Meet with gallery director, Dianna Witte, and artist, Corri-Lynn for a discussion about her latest series of oil paintings. 

RSVP











Friday, October 2, 2020

Corri-Lynn Tetz: Soft Touch, October 9th - 31st, 2020

CORRI-LYNN TETZ
SOFT TOUCH
OCTOBER 9TH - 31ST
RECEPTION: SATURDAY OCTOBER 31ST AT 2, 3 & 4PM
*RSVP REQUIRED BELOW - DETAILS MAY CHANGE DUE TO COVID RESTRICTIONS*


We are pleased to present Soft Touch, a solo exhibition by Corri-Lynn Tetz. Corri-Lynn first exhibited with us in Summer Forecast, a group show curated by Tatum Dooley in 2019. We are thrilled to be featuring Tetz again this fall with her first solo show at Dianna Witte Gallery.


           Corri-Lynn Tetz’s work focuses on the female figure as a way to explore identity, sensation and desire. Working from personal archives, fashion photography, film and pornography, she is interested in the ways images and meaning are transformed through painting and how this process disrupts notions of the gaze to re-imagine pictorial space. In this, intuitive paint handling distances each piece from its source, as she often uses disparate colour, and inventive figuration, to create the impression of transformation, affect and sensation. Her intention is that each painting occupies a space between representation and abstraction - that form provides enough information to convey bodies and space, without losing the immediacy of that first, energized, layer of paint.

         In the past year, Tetz has focused her paintings on representations of feminine sexuality. Working from ‘80s and ‘90s porn, she is interested in the ways painting unexpectedly transforms the meaning of the images and how it disrupts the primacy of the male gaze. In these images, newly embodied figures are acting on their own terms and in their own skin, free from the shame, class and dogma that might complicate the viewers relationship to such overt expressions of female sexuality. 

        For Soft Touch, Tetz made the decision to work almost entirely in a monochromatic palette, setting aside her signature flashes of saturated colour and intense underpaintings, for a more subdued and meditative approach. Citing anxiety and a need for simplification during the spring lockdown, these paintings reflect the artists desire for pleasure and comfort in the act of painting. The results are images of women, alone and taking care of themselves. As Corri-Lynn wrote, “I felt comforted. The women in my paintings seemed like they did too. They felt further away from the magazines I found them in. Suddenly they were just women taking care of themselves… having a moment with their own soft touch.”  

Corri-Lynn received her BFA from Emily Carr University in 2003 and her MFA from Concordia University in 2015. She has received numerous awards and fellowships including the Project Fellowship from the Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation, the Residency Fellowship from the Brucebo Foundation, the Fine Arts Travel Fellowship from Concordia University, and more. She is the recipient of a Canada Council for the Arts grant.

We invite you to join us for a closing reception on Saturday October 31st at 2, 3 & 4PM. We kindly ask that visitors book their time slot with us in advance. In order to maintain physical distancing measures we are limiting each time slot and request that you wear a face mask. Our hope is that these intimate receptions will create a more memorable experience for the artist and viewer. If you have any questions, please email us at info@diannawitte.com.
We look forward to seeing you!












Tuesday, September 8, 2020

Fall Forecast, Curated by Tatum Dooley: September 11th - October 3rd, 2020

FALL FORECAST
CURATED BY TATUM DOOLEY
SEPTEMBER 11TH - OCTOBER 3RD
RECEPTION: SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 26TH, 2-3PM & 3-4PM

We are pleased to present Fall Forecast, a group show curated by Tatum Dooley (@cdnartforecast), and featuring work by Marissa Y Alexander, Anni Spadafora, Kizi Spielmann Rose and Alex Kisilevich. This exhibition is Dooley's second curatorial project in a series of collaborations with Dianna Witte Gallery. 



Art has prepared me for living with a significant lack of human touch—gone is the weight of a hug, a spontaneous hand grasped for a few moments. While six feet of distance between each other still feels alien, we are used to not touching art. In fact, we embrace the boundary of this interaction as a necessary part of art's preservation. The lack of touch adds something, a closer way of looking. 

I didn’t mean to curate a show that so closely revolves around touch, but looking at the group of artists I feel that’s what subconsciously happened. Simply by looking at the works in fall forecast, we can understand their texture. The patterns of Anni Spadafora's textiles and Kizi Spielmann Rose's paintings are contemporary takes on textile patterns—plaid and weaves made dynamic through glitches, saturated colours, and bio-metric layers. 

Marissa Y Alexander's ceramics likewise are made up of layers that compile to make a deceivingly flat surface—solid and smooth. A three-dimensional ceramic that's camouflaged as a painting. 

In addition to Alex Kisilevich’s photographs, his video work captures impossible movement—fabric dancing without touch or wind. The result is magical, opening up the possibilities of a world without touch, but not without tenderness.

- Tatum Dooley 



Tatum Dooley is a writer based in Toronto. Her work has appeared in Artforum, Bordercrossings, Canadian Art, Garage Magazine, Lapham's Quarterly, The Walrus and more. In addition to writing, Tatum curated her first art exhibition at Dianna Witte Gallery in 2019. She has written curatorial essays for Inter/Access in Toronto and Parisian Laundry in Montreal.


We invite you to join us for an opening reception and curator's talk on Saturday September 19th from 2-3PM and 3-4PM. We kindly ask that visitors book their time slot with us in advance. In order to maintain physical distancing measures we are limiting each time slot and request that you wear a face mask. Our hope is that these intimate receptions will create a more memorable experience for the artist and viewer. If you have any questions, please email us at info@diannawitte.com.


Kizi Spielmann Rose


Alex Kisilevich



Anni Spadafora


Marissa Y Alexander

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Caitlyn Murphy: Five Dresses, July 31st - August 22nd, 2020

CAITLYN MURPHY
FIVE DRESSES
JULY 31ST - AUGUST 22ND
RECEPTION: SATURDAY AUGUST 8TH, 12-6PM


Caitlyn Murphy’s exhibition at Dianna Witte Gallery, titled five dresses, takes place at the dry cleaners. The paintings trade in pastel hues—I imagine the winding tracks that snake around the front of the store making their way to the back, where the clothes are washed by the cotton candy foam of a car wash. 


The baby blue wallpaper stamped with daisies provides a rare glimpse into the back room of a dry cleaning business. The pinks of the assigned ticket to each garment echoed in a pink bow that encloses a bag of pillows, a pink dress, a spool of yarn. The faded legal-pad yellow of the receipt stapled to the top of the plastic—which is painted with so much constraint I can almost feel the slide of the material against my body as I walk down the street. I never feel as important as I do carrying a bag full of freshly laundered dry cleaning.


It’s the colour scheme, more than anything, that unites the paintings in five dresses. The consistent palette makes it feel as if each painting was shot on the same reel of film, on the same day, at the same time. The equally spaced out frames in the gallery space lends itself to this sensation. In reality, the premise of the project is a prolonged multi-day performance that involves taking the same five dresses to various dry cleaners in the city and photographing them upon return. A zoomed-in and an intentional snapshot of a phenomenon usually delegated to a chore. The use of gouache as a medium erases any evidence of touch from the brushstrokes, creating flat and cohesive compositions, not unlike the goal of the dry cleaners: to erase touch that had come before. 


The confines of tracking the same dresses as they move through different, rather mundane, and looked over spaces, tracks with the theory of the flâneur. But instead of a person wandering the city wistfully, rejecting a consumer-based society by not participating in commerce, it’s the dresses that roam.


I think of the films of Chantal Akerman, who was heavily influenced by the flâneur in her films. There are entire films by Akerman that take place in one building, (La Chambre, Hotel Monterey, for example) where she lets the camera linger, shifting the known into the unknown, the under-looked to overlooked. Just as Akerman can make me see a hotel in a new light, a motion-picture version of a Hopper painting, Murphy makes me look at the shoebox confines of a dry cleaner in a new way. Why do I, like Murphy’s project, only have five dresses that are worthy of the care of dry cleaners? The bulk of my closet is made up of material that blends together and is overlooked, lasting a season or two before being passed on.


The dresses, and care Murphy shows to them, coincide with Jane Bennet’s theory of thing-power, which Bennet defines as “the moment of the vitality of things.” In other words, how humans relate to inanimate objects, animating them through attention. Bennet proposes that the sheer number of products, and our desire for them, increases how much we throw out, which in turn decreases the importance that we place on individual things. Bennet, and Murphy, offer an alternative where we place a human-like dignity onto things, giving them agency and reorienting notions of importance towards materiality. The attention Murphy gives the fabric, plastic wrappings, and setting, anthropomorphizes the dresses, making them feel full of life—flâneurs without bodies. 



We invite you to join us for an opening reception to celebrate these new works and meet the artist on Saturday August 8th. We kindly ask that visitors book their time slot with us in advance. In order to maintain physical distancing measures we are limiting each time slot to 3 guests and request that you wear a face mask. Our hope is that these intimate receptions will create a more memorable experience for the artist and viewer. If you have any questions, please email us at info@diannawitte.com.

This project was created with support from the Toronto Arts Council. Caitlyn would also like to thank Rushton Dry Cleaners, Ellis Cleaners and La Rosa Cleaners for working with her.

We look forward to sharing this work you!









Thursday, June 25, 2020

Christine Flynn: Ontario Shores, June 26th - July 25th, 2020

CHRISTINE FLYNN
ONTARIO SHORES
JUNE 26TH - JULY 25TH
RECEPTIONS: FRIDAY JUNE 26TH 5-8PM
& SATURDAY JUNE 27TH 12-6PM



We are pleased to present ONTARIO SHORES, a solo exhibition by photo-based artist, Christine Flynn. In her latest series, created exclusively for Dianna Witte Gallery, Christine explores the Canadian landscape through Ontario's shorelines and bodies of water.

We invite you to join us for an opening reception to celebrate these new works and meet the artist. In order to safely allow visitors enough time to see the exhibition we will be hosting two receptions, on June 26th & 27th. We kindly ask that visitors book their time slot with us in advance. In order to maintain physical distancing measures we are limiting each time slot to 8 guests and request that you wear a face mask if possible. Our hope is that these intimate receptions will create a more memorable experience for the artist and viewer. If you have any questions, please email us at info@diannawitte.com.