Sunday, June 23, 2019

Summer Forecast: Curated by Tatum Dooley (@cdnartforecast)

SUMMER FORECAST
CURATED BY TATUM DOOLEY

JUNE 28TH - JULY 1ST

OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY JUNE 27TH, 7-9PM
CURATOR TALK: SATURDAY JUNE 29TH, 2PM



We are thrilled to present Summer Forecast, a group exhibition curated by Tatum Dooley (@cdnartforecast), and featuring work by Keiran Brennan Hinton, Heather Goodchild, Anne Griffiths, Darby Milbrath, Kristine Moran, Caitlyn Murphy and Corri-Lynn Tetz. We invite you to join us for an opening reception on Thursday June 27th from 7-9PM.

"Learning that someone sees something completely differently than you is fraught with curiosity. The fact that another person can look at the same colour and see a different shade is mind expanding: are we the only ones that see the way we do?

Take the recent viral meme of a striped dress, for example. Did you see a gold dress or a blue one? People debated tirelessly, finding it impossible to believe that something they were so sure of—something they saw with their own two eyes!—looked completely different to others. 

Is there a way to compare notes? To get a glimpse into the way someone else views the world? The seven painters included in Summer Forecast share with us the way they see their direct surroundings: the colours, the light, the shapes. Two artists can look at the same landscape and paint completely different interpretations, giving us insight into the way they see. 


Summer Forecast exists on a spectrum. On one side, there are realist painters, who paint the world as accurately as a photograph. Firmly in this camp are Heather Goodchild and Caitlyn Murphy. From there, things get a little hazy. Keiran Brennan Hinton, Darby Milbrath, and Corri-lynn Tetz all straddle the line between realism and abstraction. Their work is a slightly skewed version of reality, colourful and mystical. Their paintings are less a photograph, more a memory of an event. Then, there are the abstract painters. Anne Griffiths and Kristine Moran exaggerate the landscapes that surround them, focussing on the colours and shapes of the hills, water, and light.


If you look at a painting by Caitlyn Murphy next to a painting by Kristine Moran, it might be difficult to see their similarities. But linked together by Corri-lynn Tetz, we start to see all the ways they're similar. How each painter translates their surroundings into pigment. Showing us the way they see the world." - Tatum Dooley

Kristine Moran, Meeting (Courtesy of Daniel Faria Gallery)

Anne Griffiths, Juicy Dry

Corri-Lynn Tetz, Stacked

Darby Milbrath, Still Life

Heather Goodchild

Keiran Brennan Hinton, May 17 (3:00AM), Courtesy of 1969 Gallery

Caitlyn Murphy, Wall to Wall

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Anna Valdez: Bones & Stones, May 31st - June 23rd, 2019

ANNA VALDEZ
BONES & STONES

MAY 31ST - JUNE 23RD


We are thrilled to present Bones & Stones, an exhibition of new paintings from Anna Valdez. This is Anna's second solo show with Dianna Witte Gallery.  

Valdez's vibrant studio still lifes explore her personal history and identity through the environment surrounding her. Relying on photographs, tradition, horticulture and stories, Valdez builds her own narratives in a way that reflects both a personal and collective experience. Arranging and re-arranging her studio to suit the needs of her creative interests (painting, gardening, etc), allows Valdez to draw on relationships between spaces and objects.

Anna Valdez lives and works in Oakland, California. She received her MFA from Boston University in 2013. Beginning in 2018 and continuing into this year, Anna was honoured to be featured in The Beyond: Georgia O'Keeffe and Contemporary Art, a retrospective exhibition of O'Keeffe's work at Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, AR and New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, CT.  This summer you can also view her paintings in group shows at Richard Heller Gallery Santa Monica, CA and Nancy Margolis Gallery New York,NY.







Wednesday, May 1, 2019

Erin McSavaney: AFTER REAL, May 3rd - 26th, 2019

ERIN MCSAVANEY
AFTER REAL

MAY 3RD - 26TH
OPENING RECEPTION: SATURDAY MAY 11TH, 4-6PM


In AFTER REAL, Erin McSavaney attempts to find a way forward as he continues to work in post-photorealism. McSavaney explores inventive methods of painting abstraction in a photorealistic manner, juxtaposing fictitious geometric pattern of his own imagining overtop of real-world landscape and architecture. Alongside large-scale works we are pleased to be including a number of small studies on paper with this exhibition, offering a glimpse into McSavaney's conceptual process and the developmental stages of the work.

Please join us for an opening reception with the artist present on Saturday May 11th from 4-6PM.













Friday, March 29, 2019

Kim Atlin: Forest Interiors, April 4th - 28th, 2019

KIM ATLIN
FOREST INTERIORS

APRIL 4TH - 28TH
OPENING RECEPTION: FRIDAY APRIL 6TH, 2-4PM


We are pleased to present a new series of oil paintings from Toronto artist
Kim Atlin. In her latest investigation of Forest Interiors, Atlin unearths more layers of texture beneath and adds layers of drawing on top. It advances towards and away from abstraction while maintaining depth of space. Please join us for an opening reception with the artist on Saturday April 6th from 2-4PM.







Friday, March 1, 2019

JJ Jasperson: March 7th - 31st, 2019

JJ JASPERSON

WINTER WHIMSY & OTHER PAINTINGS
MARCH 7TH - 31ST

OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY MARCH 7TH, 6-9PM


Jasperson decided to take on this formidable winter with a warm coat of paint and a decent set of palette knives. This exhibition of recent works focuses on memories of many winters past and present. The locations are Canadian; every where from British Columbia, Manitoulin Island, Lake Huron to Algonquin Park.  Her subjects remain the same; times and places spent with family and friends. This time, however, many of paintings are blanketed with a layer of snow. Different subjects required different styles to evoke the feelings Jasperson was trying to convey, from the transparent drizzled washes on still planes of water to the thick impasto effects used to create the drifts of snow against dark, wintery woods.

Jasperson was born in Toronto. She received her BA (Honours English) from Bishops University and her Communication and Design Degree from OCAD. She worked for 10 years as a graphic designer, textile designer and illustrator, in both the corporate and retail sector. She then took a hiatus to raise her triplet daughters who have brought her joy, and much subject matter to explore.

JJ Jasperson's finished canvases are done in oil paints. Her preparatory sketches are in watercolour. She uses her photocopier, iPhone, Mac & printer to play around with her sketches to create a final composition which she will then reinterpret on canvas in oil paints. This technique allows her to be deliberate in composition & technique while remaining fresh and playful in her approach.












Friday, February 8, 2019

Yangyang Pan: Sultry Garden, February 8th - March 3rd, 2019

YANGYANG PAN: SULTRY GARDEN
FEBRUARY 8TH - MARCH 3RD

OPENING RECEPTION: SATURDAY FEB. 9TH, 2-4PM


We are excited to present Yangyang Pan's latest series of oil paintings Sultry Garden. This is Pan's 4th solo exhibition with Dianna Witte Gallery. Please join us for an opening reception with the artist present on Saturday February 9th from 2-4PM.
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Qi is a spiritual energy that represents a vital energy in Chinese culture. It roughly translates to “air.” In YangYang Pan’s paintings, the spirit of Qi is palatable. The work vibrates with the richly pigmented colours and palatable brushstrokes. “My abstractions certainly share an interest in Monet’s light, and the emotional evocation is rooted in the spirit of Oriental aesthetics,” Pan said.
Pan’s practice has spanned over ten years, resulting in a visible confidence. Each brush stroke and choice of colour feel imbued with purpose. The work in “Sultry Garden,” are highly energetic paintings, looking at them, you get the sense they are buzzing. Layers of brush strokes cumulate in a lyrical abstraction made up of a symphony of colours.
Clusters of forest green make way for yellows and reds, before succumbing to off-white in “Cheerful Moment.” The downward movement of the paint strokes invokes the sense of rain, whereas the upward strokes towards the top of the painting can be read as a metaphor for the growth that rain begets. It’s hard not to feel happy when looking at Pan's canvases, yet they avoid being reductive—Pan doesn’t shy away from colours, but balances out the bright pigments with dark vignettes that frame the paintings, creating a moodiness and depth to the otherwise upbeat paintings.
While the large canvases draw the viewer into the work and fill up a space, the small works “focus on the compelling details and texture, the subtle interaction, that may be some kind of reaching out for something more personal,” Pan said. In one of Pan’s smaller canvases, "Mist Light,” she uses thick, wide brushstrokes that create a minimalist quality. In “Sultry Garden,” Pan has begun experimenting with using her fingers and newspaper to apply paint—the variety of paint strokes are visible and result in an added intimacy to the work. Pan’s work is gestural, yet controlled. Her intuition for balance comes through in her paintings in multiple forms.